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Ode to Michael Goldberg: Selective Thievery and the Practice of Looking

Sep 13 - Jan 18 2009

UB Anderson Gallery

The exhibition traces the evolution of Michael Goldberg’s work from the early cubist inspired drawings of the 1940s to the monumental nonobjective paintings of the early 1960s and the abstracted landscapes and still-lifes of the mid- to late ‘60s, the monochromatic paintings of the 1970s and ending with his use of grids in the 1980s.

Goldberg (1924-2007) is known for his large-scale abstract paintings, which reflect the early influence of Abstract Expressionism on his 60-year-long career. In addition to a group of important paintings from the university’s collection, loans of artwork from several private collections and public institutions, many shown publicly for the first time in years, provide a unique opportunity to observe the development of the artist’s life and work through drawings, paintings, and prints dating from the 1940s to the 1980s.

Curated by Amber Smith as part of her art history thesis for the Department of Visual Studies.

Catalog available with essays by Amber Smith and Klaus Kertess.